Conflict of Interest Policy

 Conflict of Interest Policy

This policy outlines the principles and procedures for managing conflicts of interest within EMSC. It is the policy of EMSC that tutors and assessors acting on behalf of an EMSC

must be free from conflicts of interest that could adversely affect their judgement or objectivity to the organisation in conducting business and other work related activities .

EMSC recognises that tutors and assessors may take part in legitimate financial, business, charitable and other activities outside of their EMSC roles, but any potential conflict of interest raised by those activities must be acknowledged, disclosed, and in relevant cases properly managed.

It is the responsibility of each individual to recognise situations in which they have a conflict of interest, or might reasonably be seen by others to have a conflict; to disclose this conflict and to take such further steps as may be appropriate and set out in more detail under the procedure below.

 Definition

A conflict of interest may generally be defined as a conflict between the official responsibilities of a tutor, assessor, and internal verifier and any other interests the particular individual may have and as such could compromise or appear to compromise their decisions.

A conflict of interest exists in relation to an awarding organisation where the organisation’s interests in any activity undertaken by it, on its behalf, or by a member of its group have the potential to lead it to act contrary to its interests in the development, delivery and award of qualifications in accordance with its conditions of recognition.

A person who is connected to the development, delivery or award of qualifications by the awarding organisation has interests in any other activity which have the potential to lead that person to act contrary to his or her interests in that development, delivery or award in accordance with the awarding organisations conditions of recognition

Examples of Conflicts of Interests

It is not possible to provide a definitive list of examples of conflicts of interests, but the following are examples of situations that could lead to actual or perceived conflicts of interest:

  • Tutors and assessors working with a business outside of EMSC that is in direct competition with them.
  • Tutors and assessors participating in the appointment, promotion, supervision or evaluation of a person with whom the person, has close or familial ties.
  • Tutors and assessors having a close or familial relationship with an EMSC learner, or

Learner’s family whilst being involved in decisions about the outcome of their qualification.

  • Tutors and assessors using non-public EMSC information or EMSC learner data for personal gain or advantage.

The existence of such interests as those outlined above, does not necessarily imply conflict, but is likely to give an appearance of conflict and as such should be declared.

Process

  • It is the duty of all tutors and assessors to disclose any actual or potential conflict of interest.
  • All tutors and assessors are required to inform EMSC in writing of possible conflicts of interest.
  • This information is held on file by EMSC
  • If the individual concerned has any changes to their declared circumstances, they must inform EMSC immediately in writing.

Action

Most situations require no further action than the written declaration. In some instances, however, the information declared on the form will require some follow up action, in order for the conflict of interest to be managed appropriately.

The approach agreed between the line manager and the tutor and assessor, will be documented and held with the written declaration.

Examples of actions that could be taken.

  • Individual not taking part in discussions or decisions of certain matters.
  • Referring certain matters for decision to others with no vested interest.
  • Agreeing not to be involved in particular training.
  • Declaring an interest when it is appropriate to do so.
  • Referring the matter to EMSC for advice and guidance.

Revised and updated Aug 2018